Starfish Therapies

March 19, 2017

What is the Vestibular System?

Vestibular_Swing
The vestibular system is made up of fluid filled organs that are located in the inner ear.  It is one of the essential components of balance and helps provide us information about our body’s movement.  The vestibular system responds to gravitational pull in order to send signals to our brain about the direction and speed at which we are moving.  It is also responsible for allowing us to stabilize our eyes during movement and helps us maintain our head in an upright position.

 

A properly working vestibular system is essential for all activities! Some essential tasks the vestibular system helps your child complete include: scanning words in a book to read, following a ball as it travels towards them through air, maintaining their balance during playtime activities, and maintaining an upright posture.

 

If a child’s vestibular system is not properly functioning, they may be under or over reactive to movement input.  If your child has an under reactive vestibular system, they may constantly attempt to seek out vestibular input-such as enjoying spinning in fast circles, swinging, or running fast and crashing down.  They may also appear more unbalanced or “clumsy.” Over reactive signs may include being more sedentary, fearful of fast movements, or being overly sensitive to fast or sudden movements.

 

Some additional common signs and symptoms of inadequate vestibular function include: dizziness, unsteadiness, vertigo, and trouble reading or reporting dizziness when reading, occasional stumbling/falls, or reports of the room spinning around them.

 

Even a fully developed and normally functioning vestibular system can be impacted by traumatic events. For example, vestibular dysfunction is often seen following concussion.  The vestibular system, does; however, have great potential for rehabilitation. Specific treatment techniques have been shown to re-train and enhance vestibular function.

 

There are many ways to help activate and develop your child’s vestibular system-and many of these activities you may already be doing on a daily basis.  Going to the park provides endless opportunities for vestibular system stimulation, including swings, slides, ball play, monkey bars, and running! Spinning and jumping activities are also very stimulating for the vestibular system.

April 23, 2016

Why Your Child’s Inner Ear is Important for More Than Hearing

Standing Vestibular

Imagine learning to stand for the first time, but everything around you appears to move. You can’t stabilize your gaze and everything sort of spins. Now imagine learning to walk for the first time, except you can’t focus on an object for balance. Either would be tough for anyone, especially a child.

That ability to focus your sight – That’s what’s called your vestibular system – and it’s not a part of your eye. It’s actually in your inner ear. It plays a large role in balance, telling you where your head is in space. In turn, your body responds to what you vestibular system is telling you.

But the vestibular system also plays a part in stabilizing your gaze. Try looking at an object in the room. While keeping the object in focus, shake your head from left to right – are you a little dizzy? Maybe… But were you able to keep that object in focus? Probably. That’s because, while you were shaking your head from side to side, your vestibular system was communicating with little muscles around your eye, telling them to respond, which allows you to keep your focus (known as the vestibular ocular reflex, or VOR).

And if you weren’t able to keep the object in focus? Well, it makes balance and development that much more difficult.

What could be a sign that your child’s vestibular system isn’t working properly? Some children may have trouble standing without holding onto a surface, and even fall when standing at a table without reacting to the fall (think of a falling tree). Others may have trouble walking without holding on to an adult or surface, with a tendency to rely too heavily on that support, at times appearing as an impulsive movement.

If you notice or are concerned about your child’s vestibular function, it’s a good idea to discuss it with your child’s pediatrician. They can make a good assessment or help refer you to a specialist.

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